Checklist for Hiring an in Home Care Provider

Care Facility - Elder Care Attorney in Bucks CountyMost people prefer to stay in their own home where they are comfortable, secure, and can be independent, rather than receive care in an assisted living/personal care facility. However, if your loved one decides to remain in his or her home, support can be provided by a home health care provider. Home health care providers offer a wide range of services to ensure that your loved one is well cared for.. When you begin looking for the right home health care provider for your loved one, consider the following list of tips to help you find the right caregiver.

1. Decide the level of care required.
Before you begin looking for a home health care provider, decide what level of care is needed and how much your budget will allow. Depending on the needs of your loved one, care providers can offer services ranging from companionship to personal care services.

2. Seek additional help from a geriatric care manager.
If you are unsure what services your loved one may need, consider hiring a geriatric care manager.  She (or occasionally he) will be able to assist you in the process of finding the right level of care.  The GCM can also be very helpful in making suggestions for safety within the older person’s home. A geriatric care manager is trained in any of several fields related to eldercare, focusing on a holistic approach to the wellbeing of the older person. If you would like to learn more about the assistance a geriatric care manager can provide, contact Newman Elder Law for more information.

3. Choose whether to use an agency or find a care provider on your own.
Hiring a helper through personal contacts can be fraught with all kinds of undesirable outcomes.  Two of the biggest areas of concern are making sure that your insurance and his/her insurance covers accidents both in and outside the home.  Does the recommended person drive?  Are all relevant and necessary documents valid and up-to-date?

Finding an aide through an agency can offer some advantages, including nationwide prescreening for any criminal offence, and references from previous job-situations.  These references should include length of time at that job, reliability in showing up on time, hands-on kindness and caring, patience, ability to communicate with someone incapacitated by poor vision, deafness, dementia.

Questions to the agency should include: what is the expected/promised coverage if an aide is sick or cannot get to the job?  How do you train your aides?  Does someone from the agency come out to assess the older person’s personality and needs before sending a caregiver?  What if there is a poor “fit” — i.e., we don’t get along?  Do your aides all speak English?  You should know that the agency will send you an aide they consider suitable for you.  You may not agree.  Will the agency let me know ahead of time if a different aide is coming that day?

4. Find candidates who meet your care needs.
If you are not using an agency to find a care provider, you can begin looking for candidates on your own. Begin by asking friends and family for caregiver referrals. Also consider contacting your local senior center, adult daycare center or place of worship for referrals.

5. Select the right candidates to consider.
Begin by writing a detailed job description that you can easily share with applicants. Your description should include the level of care you require, daily tasks including driving, work hours and days, and other responsibilities. Also decide how much you are able to pay, and if you will need to pay taxes and possibly a Social Security contribution.

6. Conduct an initial interview.
Once you have received applications from qualified care providers, conduct an initial interview in a public place like a restaurant or coffee house.  This initial interview will allow you to assess the person’s personality, work experience, and to see if you actually like him/her and feel comfortable in their company.  After all, they will be in your loved one’s home, probably unsupervised.  Are you comfortable with that?

7. Additional interviews.                                                                                            After conducting an initial interview and having carefully reviewed their job history and qualifications, you might invite the ones you trust and like best to visit the older person at home.  Be careful in introducing the aide to the older person, since fear is a known part of dementia. If there is no dementia apparent, then you and the older person can discuss the aide’s qualifications and make a short list of those liked best.  While conducting this more detailed interview, discuss your loved one’s likes and dislikes, health concerns and all responsibilities you will require. Also talk about salary and benefits, including vacation and time off.

8. Check references.
References are an important factor to consider when hiring a home care provider. Be sure to ask for at least three professional references that you can contact. A reference can give you a detailed understanding of what the person is like to work with and employ. When you call the references, ask questions that will give you a clear understanding of the candidate as a person and as a caregiver. Consider asking about his or her reliability and attendance, why he or she left their past positions, and if there were any problems. But please note: these days many employers will give only dates of employment rather than anything more important, relevant to re-hire, and personal.

9. Consider conducting a criminal background check.
A criminal background check is common in the fields of medicine and care giving. Along with ensuring the candidate has no criminal history, a national (not just a state) criminal background check will help give you peace of mind.

10. Prepare employment paperwork.
Once you have selected the ideal candidate, prepare your entire agreement in writing. In your employment agreement, include information about a trial period if you would like one, job responsibilities, salary information, pay schedule, time off, start date, and your termination policy. Of course, you will have this dated and signed, with a copy for yourself and for the aide.

A home health care provider can be beneficial for elders who wish to remain in their homes. If your loved one needs additional care and wants to remain at home, follow these steps to find a care provider who meets your loved one’s needs. Once you have found the right care provider, be sure to visit your loved one regularly to ensure he or she is receiving the best care possible. If you have questions about home care services or need help selecting a home care provider, contact Newman Elder Law for assistance.

Sources:

http://www.aarp.org/relationships/caregiving-resource-center/info-08-2010/pc_home_care_worker.html

http://www.elderlawanswers.com/checklist-hiring-a-home-care-provider-12186

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Senior Woman Giving Credit Card Details On The PhoneWe try to protect the older members of our families. We look in on them when we can, we advise them to keep their homes secure, we make sure they get to their doctor’s appointments.

But in some cases, threats to senior citizens can come from people half a world away.

Financial scams targeting seniors are – unfortunately – everywhere these days. Here are some of the most common, according to the National Council on Aging.

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Here are 5 ways to help your elderly loved one avoid feeling lonely.

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If you sense that your elderly loved ones are unhappy, follow the tips below to help brighten the holiday season for them:

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5 Things to Consider When Writing Your Will

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Once you have decided to create a will, keep these five things in mind:

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Summer Fun for Elders and Caregivers

Whether you enjoy staying active or reading a good book, remember to stay cool and enjoy the warm weather.

Whether you enjoy staying active or reading a good book, remember to stay cool and enjoy the warm weather.

The hot summer months can be hard for everyone, but especially seniors. Often it is advisable to stay indoors and keep cool in order to avoid heat related illnesses. Nevertheless, summer is a time to enjoy the warm weather and the activities that come with it.

How can you and your caregiver stay active and enjoy your summer while staying cool and healthy? Here are some tips and examples of senior friendly summer activities.

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Caregiver Appreciation

As we know, May is Older Americans month but let’s also remember to celebrate the more than 45 million family members who care for seniors on a daily basis. On average, these caregivers provide 20 hours of unpaid caregiving support each week.

Josh Fotheringham, a former Apple software designer and current CEO of Caring in Place®developed the Caring in Place® iPhone app and online portal to help family members manage the complexities of caring for their aging loved ones.

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Older Americans Month

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Each May, the nation celebrates Older Americans Month to recognize older Americans for their contributions and also to provide them with information to help keep them active and healthy. This year’s theme is injury prevention – Safe Today. Healthy Tomorrow.

Older Americans, age 65+, are at a much higher risks for injuries, violence and even death than the younger population. This year’s focus on keeping older Americans safe and healthy aims to change current statistics.

 

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Supplemental Security Income (SSI)

 

SSI is the basic federal safety net program for the elderly, blind and disabled, providing them with a minimum guaranteed income. For 2014, the maximum federal SSI benefit is $721 a month for an individual and $1,082 a month for a couple. These amounts are supplemented in most states.  For example, Pennsylvania adds a supplement of $22.10 a month for eligible individuals.

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