What to Consider in Retirement Planning

retirement money

Read up on retirement planning in America, and you come across some pretty startling statistics:

  • One in three Americans have no retirement savings. The same number of people say they expect to work in retirement to supplement their income
  • More than 40 percent of single seniors over 65 get at least 90 percent of their income from Social Security
  • Even healthy couples will pay close to $400,000 on health care in retirement

With all that in mind, it becomes painfully apparent how important it is to plan for retirement, yet it’s a process that many people aren’t even sure how to approach.

With that in mind, we’d like to suggest some questions you should ask to help start putting together your retirement plan.

Continue Reading What to Consider in Retirement Planning

Choosing the Right Trustee

Choosing the Right Trustee

When planning for your loved ones’ future, you may consider creating a trust to protect assets set aside for them. If you create a trust, you will need a reliable and trustworthy person to name as the trustee who will manage the trust. Choosing the correct trustee is an important decision because he or she will be responsible for carrying out your wishes when managing the trust.

The trustee will be responsible for duties such as managing investments, paying bills, preparing tax returns, and managing other accounts within the trust.

Before choosing a trustee, consider the following points that will help you determine who will be best suited for the role.

1. A trustee must be over the age of eighteen and capable of managing his or her own affairs successfully.

2. The trustee should be completely trustworthy and committed to the beneficiary’s best interests.

3. The trustee should be able to make sound judgments and have a strong understanding of his or her duties as the trustee. While not required, legal or financial expertise is valuable.

4.  If a person is going to be the trustee of a special needs trust, knowledge of public benefits and how to avoid invalidating these benefits is beneficial.

5. The trustee should be someone who is healthy and will be able to continue managing your trust for many years to come.

6.  A trustee should have the time to devote to managing your trust effectively. If the person you are considering is very busy, you should consider other candidates before making your final choice.

7.  If you don’t know someone who would be a suitable trustee, consider hiring a professional trustee or institution to manage your trust. Professional trustees may include a trust company, accountant, lawyer, or investment manager or advisor. However, professional trustees or institutions do charge a fee or percentage to manage your trust.

8.  Consider co-trustees if you would like to have a trusted friend or family member and a professional trustee manage your trust together.

9.  Understand your family dynamics when selecting a trustee. If you are choosing a family member to be the trustee, try to avoid conflicts between family members and explain to other relatives why you have chosen a particular person to be the trustee.

10. If you make a relative or friend your trustee, decide who will be the successor in the event that the person is no longer able to manage your trust.

After you have chosen a trustee, it is advisable to reexamine your choice every few years to ensure that your trustee is still the best choice for your needs. If circumstances change, you may need to assign a different trustee who is better suited to the required responsibilities.

If you need assistance preparing a trust or choosing the right trustee, contact Newman Elder Law. If you want to learn more about our elder law services, click here.

Life as a Solo Senior

Lonely old man staring out of a windowBaby Boomers are known for many things, two of which will affect them as they age, namely they have the highest divorce rates and the highest rates of childless marriages.  Since many boomers don’t have a spouse or children, many will face aging issues without the help of family members or close friend.  In addition, many Boomers and Generation X’ers have never been married or had a companion and they too will face aging issues alone.

Continue Reading Life as a Solo Senior

Signs an Elderly Loved One Needs Help at Home

There are signs to watch for that will tell you when your elderly loved one needs help at home.

There are signs to watch for that will tell you when your elderly loved one needs help at home.

It is no secret that we are living longer. In fact, the life expectancy for women in the U.S. is 81.2 years and for males, it’s 76.4 years.

Still, that doesn’t mean that elderly parents or relatives will always be spry and able to easily manage their activities of daily living. How can you tell if your loved one needs help at home?

You don’t want to offend them by imposing something on them, but at the same time you don’t want something to happen that could have been avoided, had there been some assistance in place. Here are some signs to watch for:

Continue Reading Signs an Elderly Loved One Needs Help at Home

Retirement Planning

iStock_000011860918Small

No matter your age, there are certain things that you need to do to prepare financially for retirement. The earlier you start, the better off you will be.

  1. Save!
    It is recommended that you put aside at least 10 to 15 percent of your annual income. You should put more away if you are closer to retirement and haven’t put much aside yet.
  2. Create an Emergency Fund
    Creating an emergency fund will insure that you will have some money to help you out if a situation arises where you lose your regular source of income. It should have enough money to last you three to six months. It is for emergencies only, so a purchase of a new flat screen TV doesn’t qualify.
  3. Pay Down Debt
    If you are struggling with debt, there is a technique by Dave Ramsey called the “Debt Snowball.” List your debts from lowest to highest. Pay the minimum balance on all of your debts, except the smallest, and pay down the smallest debt fast. Once your smallest debt is gone, move onto the next lowest debt and work on getting that paid. Continue this process until all debt is gone. Continue Reading Retirement Planning